findings

This is my research blog to go alongside my main one http://www.stephanieweise.tumblr.com, where I put all the videos and other relevant things I come across.

art21:

"A work of art doesn’t have to be explained. If you do not have any feeling about this, I cannot explain it to you. If this doesn’t touch you, I have failed." —Louise Bourgeois

Looking back at Louise Bourgeois's Helping Hands (1993–96), relocated from Chicago’s Jane Addams Memorial Park to Chicago Women’s Park in 2011, and featured in Art21’s 2001 Identity episode.

WATCH: Louise Bourgeois in Identity [available in the U.S. only] | Additional videos

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art in the Twenty-First Century Season 1 episode, Identity, 2001. © Art21, Inc. 2001.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

— 1 week ago with 853 notes
theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.
It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.
Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

theatlantic:

For Shame: The Giant Poster That Shows Drone Pilots the People They’re Bombing

A new project, initiated by a collective of artists from around the world including the French JR, has tried to reach the people pulling the trigger in America’s drone wars—the drone operators themselves.

It’s called “Not A Bug Splat,” and its gets its name from the term drone operators use for a successful “kill,” because—in the pixelated grayscale of the drone camera—ending a human life looks like squashing a bug.

Read more. [Image: Not a Bug Splat]

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— 2 weeks ago with 2227 notes
graphicsrca:

Poster for the 1963 exhibition designed by Thelma Rosco

graphicsrca:

Poster for the 1963 exhibition designed by Thelma Rosco

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— 3 weeks ago with 33 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Oscar Monzón

Karma

Oscar Monzón’s book “Karma” is a study of the car as public and personal space. The book is intelligently designed, with strange juxtapositions of shiny chrome mechanical objects and surreal portraits from odd angles. Monzón uses an intense flash aesthetic and embraces his invasion of others privacy: showing photographs of drivers doing drugs, flipping the camera off, and in dire situations. Monzón’s book shows the in between space of the car, and all the absurd activities that occur within this box that so many of us spend endless hours in. 

text written by Cole Tracy

— 3 weeks ago with 364 notes

cinephilearchive:

“These continuity Polaroids offer a glimpse into an unused scene from ‘The Shining.’ In the finished film, the scene of Wendy and Danny exploring the hedge maze is intercut with shots of Jack wandering the hotel, bored and suffering from writer’s block. As originally filmed, however, Jack then wanders to the balcony overlooking the Colorado Lounge, and glances down to his writing table to see something that hadn’t been there previously — a large scrapbook. Jack’s typewriter, paper, cigarettes, pens, etc. have been mysteriously arranged in a quasi-Native American design on the floor leading to the table and the scrapbook.

Jack then goes down to investigate and finds that the scrapbook is full of newspaper clippings from the Overlook Hotel’s lurid past. He becomes entranced with it. The scrapbook figured in several other deleted scenes, and provided the original inspiration for Jack to finally begin writing. Most of the scenes with the scrapbook have been omitted in the final film, though there are still some lingering shots where the scrapbook lies on Jack’s writing table, unexplained.

In earlier drafts of the screenplay, the final shot of the movie is a long slow camera move towards the open scrapbook sitting upon the table. The camera continues to track forward until it finds the vintage ballroom party photo with Jack smiling out from it. When Kubrick decided to excise the scrapbook element from the story, he presumably repurposed that same idea by tracking across the lobby and finding the same framed photo on the wall.” —The Overlook Hotel, ephemera related to Stanley Kubrick’s Masterpiece of Modern Horror, ‘The Shining’

Below: continuity polaroid of Kubrick and Nicholson on the Pantry set of ‘The Shining.’

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— 1 month ago with 2264 notes

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Graphic Design: Super blog showcases amazing female design talent

Last weekend was International Women’s Day, a worldwide celebration of extraordinary female talent and a call-to-action for equality. But it’s easy to be assuaged by such high profile initiates and lose sight of how much more work there is to do, and stats like this stop you in your tracks; when Tori Hann went to the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design in 2013 she found that although 71% of the graphic design department were women, female designers accounted for just six per cent of those designers studied as part of the curriculum.

And so Women of Graphic design was born, an ongoing online resource “meant to be a source for learning and sharing, and ultimately, a platform to spark discussion.”

Tori and her co-curator Kathleen Sleboda explain: “It’s not the problem of just one institution. Though there were and are many men to impact the history and world of graphic design, there have been great female designers right along side them. In fact, the National Education Association reports that 54% of working designers are women. But why is a whole group being ignored in institutionalised design history?”

As ever with resources like this there are names we know well alongside a host of great talent to discover for the first time. And of course this shouldn’t have to exist in 2014, but my word we’re glad it does.

1. Mary Blair

2. Mia Daminato

3. Tracy Ma

4. Hansje van Halem

5.  Megi Zumstein

Womenongraphicdesign

— 1 month ago with 137 notes

7knotwind:

about a year ago I began making these accumulated line drawings—
what began as a ritualized, private, rule-based drawings, rooted in ideas surrounding our conception of and relationship to our memory, has expanded to incorporate related issues of temporality and permanence, strength and fragility, fullness and emptiness, presence and absence and the intersection of private and public. 

Using only repeated lines (that never intersect or overlap), these works evolved as a way to engage both my propensity towards repetitive, obsessive mark making and my desire to give up a degree of control while focusing on the ritualized ACT of drawing. The repetition and accumulation of line is employed as a means connecting to both the passage of time and the processes of memory formation. The fabric-like structures that emerge mirror the way a series of minutes or seconds coalesce in our minds into one unified ‘moment’ or memory. 

As this series progresses the work is moving away from the small sheets of paper where it began, occupying envelopes sent around the world to people I’ve never met,  created over several awkward hours
 on the walls of public bathrooms, insinuated in place of signs and billboards, rendered on the walls of temporary structures inserted in public spaces and most recently projected on buildings. 

I am excited by the new directions the work is taking and I am grateful for all of your interest and attention over the last year—
Best,
Kevin 


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— 1 month ago with 607 notes